Writing on EZ Erase with Chalk Ink® Markers

Chalk Ink® Markers write beautifully on our ChalkTalk chalkboard film. But did you know that these markers are also great for writing on EZ Erase dry erase vinyl? In fact, Chalk Ink® Markers write on just about any smooth surface.

Applied to my refrigerator is the prototype of the EZ Erase film. (Shown in the photo below). Usually I recommend using the Quartet markers for writing on the film. But after four years, ghosting finally appeared...I guess that nothing lasts forever. Eventually even the mildest solvents will chemically etch the surface of a film giving the surface some tooth for residual ink to adhere to.

 

As a creature of habit, I don't like to change anything. In this case, I had no choice. The ghosting was getting worse with each use. Instead of changing the vinyl, it was easier to change to a different pen.

I decided to use the Chalk Ink® pens. Two series of these markers will write on vinyl films: Dry Erase Design and Wet Wipe Design. The Dry Erase Design works just like a standard dry erase marker. When it comes time to remove the writing, just wipe the surface clean with an eraser or a rag. This type of marker does not require water for removal.

The Wet Wipe Design type of marker uses a water-based ink. Once the ink has dried on the surface of EZ Erase, the ink resists smearing. To clean the ink from the surface of ChalkTalk, simply wipe the ink with a damp rag. The ink should come off easily and with no ghosting residue.

While water will remove the Wet Wipe Design ink, I found that RapidTac and Windex work better. The picture below shows were the writing was removed with no residue.

 

For more information on Chalk Ink®, visit their website at www.chalkink.com.

This article was written by Jim Hingst, Business Development Manager-Technology for RTape Corp. and posted on Hingst Sign Post.



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