Using Hardboards for Sign Substrates

16-Sep-2014

A sign maker asked if he could mount a printed vinyl graphic to Masonite, which is another name for hardboard. Because hardboard is porous, we told him to either paint or varnish the sheet to prevent it from absorbing moisture which could adversely affect the adhesion of the graphics. A better answer is to use a product called Scooter Board™ which is a hardboard with a water-resistant urethane coating. Sign makers use Scooter Board™ for the product, such a point-of-purchase displays, trade show graphics, event signage and election signs. As well as being an excellent choice for screen printing, it's also an ideal substrate for applied vinyl graphics and digital prints. Read more

Limiting Ink Density

05-Aug-2014

In past articles, I cautioned that you should limit ink densities to no greater than 250% to 275%. One reason, is that the volume of ink that you print on a substrate has a direct effect on the dimensional stability of the film that you are printing on. The more ink that you lay down, the more contraction of the vinyl you can expect as the ink dries. When this happens, the applied graphic can peel at the edges. Even before the film is applied, the vinyl can start to curl at its edges on the release liner. Failure to limit ink density can also lead to other problems, which I will expound upon shortly.

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Mimaki Introduces a New Generation of Latex Printers

05-Aug-2014

About five years ago, latex inkjet printers were introduced to the sign market, rapidly gaining acceptance as affordable alternatives to solvent and ecosolvent systems. This novel technology certainly filled a big void in the market. Any of the curling issues that printers encountered when printing on some pressure-sensitive vinyl films with solvent and ecosolvent inks were resolved, because latex inks are water-based. Read more

Removing Surface Protection Masking from Plastic

05-Aug-2014

Usually removing the paper surface protection masking on plastic is easy. If you are experiencing any trouble removing the application tape from a plastic surface, read this article for a few different solutions. Read more

AT75.1 - Embossed High Tack Film Application Tape

05-Aug-2014

AT75.1 Clear Choice is an embossed clear film application tape. The higher tack adhesive coated on the film transfers problematic films and makes tough applications easier. In this article, we explain where users should consider using AT75.1. Read more

Plotter Cutting VinylEfx and EZ Erase Films

05-Aug-2014

VinylEfx® and EZ Erase™ vinyl films cut as easily as most glossy, white calendered vinyls. For best cutting results, use a sharp 45° blade at slow cutting speeds with swivel type of cutters. Optimal cutting pressures vary depending on plotter type and blade sharpness. Read more

Removing Rock Hard Tape Adhesive

05-Aug-2014

Many of our customers use our paper application tapes as a protective masking for substrates or for painting. Masking on products stored indoors and not exposed to high heat should remove without problems. When paper application tape is exposed to high heat and prolonged sunlight, however, you can encounter big trouble that may be irreparable. Read more

New RTape Website Features Mobile Responsive Design

05-Aug-2014

RTape Corp. (SOUTH PLAINFIELD, NJ) launched their new website optimized for compatibility with mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. The new mobile friendly website represents RTape’s commitment to providing the graphic communications professional with the most relevant and useful information. Read more

Limiting Ink Density

03-Jul-2014

In past articles, I cautioned that you should limit ink densities to no greater than 250% to 275%. One reason, is that the volume of ink that you print on a substrate has a direct effect on the dimensional stability of the film that you are printing on. The more ink that you lay down, the more contraction of the vinyl you can expect as the ink dries. When this happens, the applied graphic can peel at the edges. Even before the film is applied, the vinyl can start to curl at its edges on the release liner. Failure to limit ink density can also lead to other problems, which I will expound upon shortly. Read more

What Causes Liner Curl?

04-Jun-2014

Would you like paper or plastic? In the sign, screen and digital markets, vinyl film manufacturers generally pick paper release liners. Plastic film liners are more frequently used for label stock. Paper liners afford many advantages compared to film liners. They are very heat stable…more stable at high temperatures because plastic can deform. Paper also provides consistent performance. Most importantly, paper liners are more cost effective than film liners. Read more





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